Effect of Active and Passive Recovery on Intermittent Exercise Performance

Marcello Alves

Abstract


The intermittent exercise consists of a series of repeated blocks of work or effort, alternated with periods of recovery. They are used in many types of training for different sports, targeting different goals, but are mainly used in training programs to improve the maximal oxygen consumption. It is extremely important to deeply study such exercise, not only because it is a training method, but also because a large number of sports have the characteristic of intermittency (soccer, football, basketball, volleyball, tennis, etc.).

The effects and physiological adaptations of this form of exercise is dependent on the interaction of various parameters such as type of exercise, duration of the effort, duration of the recovery, intensity of the effort, type of recovery and total exercise time.

Therefore, the purpose of the study was to compare the performance during intermittent exercise, between the situations of active recovery and passive recovery using the blocks of effort with predominance of the alactic system (i.e. short duration and maximal intensity). The objective is to contribute not only to the sports science, but also with trainers, coaches and athletes so that they can improve their training through such exercise.


Keywords


high intensity, intermittent exercise, training, performance, interval training

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.12922/jshp.0023.2013

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