LABORATORY OBSERVATIONS OF DISSOLVED CARBON DIOXIDE TRANSPORT UNDER REGULAR BREAKING WAVES

Junichi Otsuka, Yasunori Watanabe

Abstract


Air bubbles and strong turbulence that form in water from breaking waves play important roles in gas transfer across the air-sea interface (Melville, 1996). The entrained bubbles increase the total area of air-water interface per unit volume and enhance local gas dissolution into water. The dissolved gases mix in the water mass diffuse by the strong turbulence. These gas transfer-enhancing factors have been parameterized by only wind speed in models of gas transfer velocity in the deep ocean. Bulk parameters based on wind speed cannot be used for a surf zone, where waves break due to shoaling. In a surf zone, the cross-shore distributions of entrained bubbles and the turbulent intensity vary as waves propagate. The physical process of gas transfer under the complex air-water turbulent flows in breaking waves has not been clarified. Thus, breaking-wave factors that enhance gas transfer in a surf zone cannot be parameterized. In this study, we observed the transport process of dissolved carbon dioxide (DCO2) under air-water turbulent flows in a laboratory surf zone using image measurement systems.

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References


Melville (1996): The role of surface-wave breaking in air-sea interaction, Ann Rev of Fluid Mech, 28, pp. 279-321.




DOI: https://doi.org/10.9753/icce.v36.waves.77