UPGRADING BREAKWATERS IN RESPONSE TO SEA LEVEL RISE: PRACTICAL INSIGHTS FROM PHYSICAL MODELLING

Daniel Howe, Ron J Cox

Abstract


Coastal structures in many parts of the world are typically designed for depth-limited breaking wave conditions. With a projected sea level rise of up to 90 cm by 2100 (Church et al., 2013), the design wave height for these structures is expected to increase. Many of these structures will require significant armour upgrades to accommodate these new design conditions (for example, a 25% increase in wave height will require the mass of similar density armour to be doubled).

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.9753/icce.v36.structures.35