Do volume, immunoglobulin G content, and feeding method of the first colostrum meal impact subsequent nursing behaviour and transfer of passive immunity in beef calves?

  • Lisa Gamsjäger Department of Production Animal Health, University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3280 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada
  • D.M. Haines Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, 52 Campus Dr, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4, Canada
  • E.A. Pajor Department of Production Animal Health, University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3280 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada
  • M. Levy Department of Production Animal Health, University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3280 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada
  • M.C. Windeyer Department of Production Animal Health, University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3280 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada
Keywords: beef calves, passive immunity, immunoglobluin G

Abstract

Over one third of beef calves fail to achieve adequate transfer of passive immunity (TPI) through timely ingestion of colostrum, which significantly increases their risk of pre-weaning morbidity and mortality, and decreases their average daily gain. Evidence-based colostrum management guidelines are available for dairy but not beef calves. Hence, two randomized clinical trials were designed with the following objectives: to assess the impact of (1) volume and immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration, and (2) feeding method of the first colostrum meal on time to nurse the dam and TPI.

Published
2021-10-09
Section
Research Summaries