Pharmacokinetics of cannabidiolic acid in cattle following oral dosing of industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa)

  • M. D. Kleinhenz Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, 1800 Denison Ave., Manhattan, KS 66502
  • G. Magnin Department of Anatomy & Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, 1800 Denison Ave., Manhattan, KS 66502
  • J. Lin Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine (ICCM), Kansas State University, 1800 Denison Ave., Manhattan, KS 66502
  • J. Griffin John C. Pair Horticulture Center, Kansas State University, 1901 East 95th St South, Haysville, KS 67060
  • K. E. Kleinhenz Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, 1800 Denison Ave., Manhattan, KS 66502
  • A. Curtis Department of Anatomy & Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, 1800 Denison Ave., Manhattan, KS 66502
  • M. Martin Department of Anatomy & Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, 1800 Denison Ave., Manhattan, KS 66502
  • J. F. Coetzee Department of Anatomy & Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, 1800 Denison Ave., Manhattan, KS 66502
Keywords: Industrial hemp, nutritional value, therapeutic value, cannabinoid compounds, pharmacokinetics

Abstract

Industrial hemp (IH) (Cannabis sativa containing <0.3% tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]) has gained recent traction as a novel agricultural commodity. Hemp plants and byproducts are considered to have nutritional and potentially therapeutic value. The presence of bioactive cannabinoid compounds including cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), and 9-tetrahydrocannabolic acid (THCA-A) in hemp may result in drug residues in edible tissues that pose a food safety risk to the consumer. The absence of published data describing the pharmacokinetics of cannabinoids in livestock is a significant impediment to research.

Published
2020-09-24
Issue
Section
Research Summaries