A Different Take on Live Cases: Decision Making Under Time Pressure

Kiersten M. Maryott

Abstract


A concern expressed with the traditional case method is an overall lack of “realism”. The “live” case format provides more realism in that the content of the case is timely and, given the personal involvement of the company’s key decision-makers, can cover much more detail, expressing more of the vibrancy of the actual situation (Markulis, 1985). Most of the published research related to “live” cases describes these “live” cases as more of project, spanning multiple weeks within the course (Abston, 2014; Abston & Vuong, 2017; Ancona, Ross, Wallace & Weir, 1977; Green & Erdem, 2016; Hoover, 1977; Levi, Cannon & Friesen, 2012; Markulis, 1985; Weir, 1978).  While a “live” case spanning multiple weeks can certainly provide a very valuable learning experience (Abston, 2014; Hoover, 1977; Markulis, 1985), it does not provide the student with experience making decisions under severe time constraints and with limited information. This paper explains a different format for “live” cases, a format that requires students to “think on their feet” and create recommendations for a client within a much shorter frame of time.


Keywords


live case, time pressure, realism

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References


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