How students “play” business simulations and what they learn: The preliminary report

Richard Teach, James Szot

Abstract


This paper is the initial report on a large-scale study of how business students participate in business simulations and, in general, what they learn by participating in them.  Many studies have been conducted attempting to measure the amount of learning that takes place when students participate in business simulations to little avail.  The vast majority of these studies have attempted to link individual/team performance to learning, but that faces at least three major stumbling blocks; 1) simulations, in general, are played by teams, and one cannot determine which team member did what tasks.  2) The learning that takes place may be non-cognitive or training, not cognitive learning. And 3) Most of these studies use data from students who reside in one university, are in a class or classes taught by one instructor and are “playing” a single business simulation.  This study is an attempt to determine differences in gender, US students vs. international students, simulations played by teams vs. individual players, and the final performance of the simulated firms.  Each of these measures requires more data than is typical in studies using a single class or by the instructor or for a single simulation.


Keywords


ying; Student learning; Business simulations; Many differences

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