THE UK’S FIRST CLIMATE CHANGE RISK ASSESSMENT AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR THE COAST

Ian Howard Townend, Michael Panzeri, David Ramsbottom, Ian Townend, Steven Wade

Abstract


In 2008 the Climate Change Act was passed into law in the UK. This provides a legally binding framework for reducing carbon emissions. Much of the focus of the Act is on reducing emissions and hence on mitigation measures, however, the Act also requires a risk assessment to be undertaken every five years. The assessment of the risks (including opportunities) from climate change has to address those things that have social, environmental and economic value in the UK. The objective is to create an enabling environment in which the capacity to adapt can be developed in an informed manner and identify priorities for Government action. The risk assessment informs the National Adaptation Programme and will be updated every five years. This paper outlines the method of analysis, presents some results and draws some conclusions, with particular reference to those aspects that are likely to be of interest to the coastal community.

Keywords


Climate Change; Risk Assessment;Coastal

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