COASTAL ADAPTATION IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD: A CASE STUDY IN DURBAN SOUTH AFRICA

Marli Geldenhuys, Mathijs van Ledden, Bas Jonkman, Marcel Stive, Rosh Ranasinghe

Abstract


Much of the world´s population is living along the coast. Along with rising sea levels and an increase in storminess this poses a global problem. Nicholls et al (2008) estimated that forty million people worldwide are potentially exposed in a 1 in 100 year storm event. Very little research regarding coastal adaptation in Africa has been done. Durban, with a population of approximately 3.5 million, is situated on the East Coast of South Africa. The city experienced an extreme storm event in March 2007; which caused significant coastal erosion, damage to the coastline and large financial losses (Phelp et al, 2008). A 500 metre section of the central beaches area of Durban, adjoining the city centre, was selected as the case study area for this study. This coastal section contains valuable infrastructure such as the Addington District Hospital.

Keywords


Coastal risk; climate change; developing world; vulnerability

References


Nicholls, R. J. et al. (2008), "Ranking Port Cities with High Exposure and Vulnerability to Climate Extremes: Exposure Estmiates", OECD Environment Working Papers, No.1 OECD Publishing.


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