RESULTS OF RIVER MOUTH TRAINING ON THE CLARENCE BAR, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA

Cyril D. Floyd, Bruce M. Druery

Abstract


A case study is given of river training works at the mouth of the Clarence River. The study spans a period of ninety years. Extensive hydrographic data from the later part of this period is presented and examined in detail. Prior to 1903 internal training walls had been constructed to stabilise the internal channel and stabilise the bar location at the mouth of the Clarence River. In 1956 construction started on entrance jetties with the aim of deepening the bar. The work was carried out over a period of 16 years. The slow rate of construction has allowed changes in bar depth to be compared with depths estimated by an empirical formula which relates bar depth to tidal flow and channel width. Results have shown that the empirical formula gives a reasonable estimate of bar depths and that bar depth is independent of jetty length. Results have shown that the behaviour of the bar is strongly affected by floods. Some details of bar volume and movement are presented.

Keywords


river mouth; river training; New South Wales; Clarence Bar

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