USE OP CRENULATE SHAPED BAYS TO STABILIZE COASTS

Richard Silvester, Siew-Koon Ho

Abstract


Crenulate shaped bays are the rule rather than the exception on coastal margins of oceans, inland seas or lakes where sedimentary beaches exist between headlands. They have a particular orientation to the swell or resultant wave energy vector, such that the straight tangent section is downcoast and the curved portion upcoast. The latter is a logarithmic spiral at all stages of development of the bay. When fully stable, that is no littoral drift taking place, the constant of the log-spiral equation has a specific relationship to the approach angle of the waves to the headland alignment. In this condition it is shown that diffraction and refraction are involved when waves sculpture the curved beach in the lee of the upcoast headland. A further ratio to identify stable bays appears to be the ratio of indentation length to clearance between headlands. The application of crenulate shaped bays to stabilization of a reclaimed shoreline suffering strong littoral drift on Singapore Island is described.

Keywords


bay; crenulate shaped bay; coastal stabalization

Full Text: PDF

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.