ISLAND HARBOURS AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON ADJACENT SHORES

Leon Shirdan

Abstract


The purpose of this paper is to put forward an alternative solution to the problem of reconstitution of existing ports, generally too shallow for the large tankers and ore carriers. Usually, the existing moles are extended to deep water fairways and approaches to berths, docks and basins, dredged and adapted to the draught of the new giants. This is connected with enormous expenses. Sometimes completely new port units, as for instance Europort, are built. The Island Harbours, with their seaward position, will reduce the length of the shipway to the berths and thus provide a speedier turn-out of vessels. The cost of erection and maintenance of such a harbour is in most cases lower than in that of a conventional solution, due to short breakwaters and limited quantities of primary and maintenance dredging operations. Different alternatives of island ports can be adapted in most sandy coasts over the world. The changes in coastal regime which may result from erecting an island harbour connected with the mainland by a bridge or a causeway can turn out profitable for general cargo ships, and even fisherboats, especially on the coasts where till now cutting the sea approaches through the shallows and bars was often unacceptable, due to the enormous expenses involved.

Keywords


reconstitution of existing ports; island ports/harbors

Full Text: PDF

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.