EFFECT OF LAKE WORTH AND SOUTH LAKE WORTH INLETS ON THE MOVEMENT OF LITTORAL MATERIAL

Edwin W. Eden, Jr.

Abstract


Lake Worth and South Lake Worth Inlets are artificial inlets connecting Lake Worth with the Atlantic Ocean. They are located on the east coast of Florida about 70 miles north of Miami and 300 miles south of Jacksonville. Lake Worth is a salt-water sound extending in a north-south direction, generally parallel to the ocean shore, as shown on figure 1. It is separated from the ocean by a barrier beach, 250 feet to about 3,600 feet wide and up to about 25 feet in elevation. The barrier beach is composed principally of sand, a portion of which is artificial fill over former low-lying marshy areas. There are occasional outcroppings of coquina rock on the barrier beach and in the offshore area. In this locality the offshore bottom is rather steep; the 100-fathom depth, lying closer to the shore than along other parts of the Atlantic coast, is about 5-1/2 miles offshore at Lake Worth Inlet.

Keywords


tidal inlets; sediment transport; Florida

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